Western Australian Government 

 

Family & Domestic Violence 

Western Australia’s Family and Domestic Violence Prevention Strategy to 2022

Western Australia's Family and Domestic Violence Prevention Strategy to 2022 is Western Australia’s framework for responding to family and domestic violence. It provides a long term focus to 2022 and aligns state priorities with the focus areas of the National Plan. The Outcomes of the Prevention Strategy are:

  • Prevention and Early Intervention
    Individual attitudes and behaviours within the community reflect that family and domestic violence in any form is not acceptable.
  • Safety for Victims
    Adult and child victims are safe and kept free from harm through timely and accessible services.
  • Accountability for Perpetrators
    Perpetrators are held accountable for their actions and are actively supported to cease their violent behaviour.

The Prevention Strategy serves as the WA Implementation Plan for the National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022.

Western Australia's Family and Domestic Violence Prevention Strategy to 2022

WA Strategic Plan for Family and Domestic Violence 2009-2013

Maternal Health 

Improving Maternity Services: Working Together Across WA – A policy Framework (2007)

Improving Maternity Services: Working Together Across WA provides a policy framework for maternity services in Western Australia. The framework draws together the evidence in relation to best practice, community expectations and aspirations, as well as the needs of the workforce. The framework presents several models of maternity care that research literature and practical experience demonstrate are safe and effective within certain contexts and are achievable with the current maternity workforce. A move to increase community based maternity care with greater emphasis on continuity of both care and carer are reflected within the models. An attempt has been made to present models that are known to assist in delivering services that are efficient, effective and acceptable.

The models of care are presented to assist Area Health Services to continue to develop a range of maternity care options in consultation with their local communities. The framework presents several models of maternity care that research literature and practical experience demonstrate are safe and effective within certain contexts and are achievable with the current maternity workforce. A move to increase community based maternity care with greater emphasis on continuity of both care and carer are reflected within the models tht are presented to assist Area Health Services to continue to develop a range of maternity care options in consultation with their local communities.

Improving Maternity Services: Working Together Across WA – A policy Framework (2007)

 


Improving Maternal Care for Refugee and Migrant Women in Western Australia: Report from 2013–2014 Workshops

Department of Health Western Australia (Health Networks Branch) (2014)

This report documents the findings of workshops undertaken to identify and map current service delivery; to develop an optimal pathway for support and service provisions across preconception, pregnancy, birth and postnatal care; to consider education and training of people working with refugee and migrant women and families; and to consider information sources that exist/or are required.

 In October 2012, the WNHN Continuity of Care Working Group established the Refugee and Migrant Women Working Group (RMWG) to support and inform the development of the maternity continuity of care/r models for all women in WA based on the outcomes of this initial workshop.

Improving maternal care for refugee and migrant women in Western Australia  

 

Young Aboriginal Women’s Voices on Pregnancy Care – Final Report 2014  

Department of Health, Western Australia

In Western Australia, the teenage birth rate for Aboriginal mothers is about six-times the rate found among non-Aboriginal teenagers, and represents around one quarter of all Aboriginal births each year. This project was undertaken to improve understanding of young Aboriginal women’s knowledge of pregnancy and identify factors that may encourage them to seek early pregnancy care. The study sample was recruited from metropolitan, regional and remote parts of Western Australia including those in the main target group (pregnant Aboriginal women or birth mothers 16-21 years); elder women and other Aboriginal community members; and, health and other professionals working in relevant settings.

Young Aboriginal Women’s Voices on Pregnancy Care

Perinatal Depressive and Anxiety Disorders 2008

Statewide Obstetrics Support Unit. Department of Health Western Australia

This document provides recommendations for the screening, diagnosis, referral and management of women with perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. The aim of the guidelines is to improve screening, diagnosis, referral and management of women with perinatal mental health issues; and to foster the comprehensive care of perinatal mental health issues and thus reduce morbidity and emotional suffering in women and their families.

The content of this document includes detailed information on the rationale for writing the guidelines, general information about the common diagnoses and how to screen for them, plus guidance on prevention, referral and management. Finally, there is a list of resources that can be accessed by Web or telephone, plus helpful books and journal articles. The companion document entitled ‘Perinatal Depressive and Anxiety Disorders: Summary Guidelines for Western Australia’ is a quick reference for daily use.

The intended audience of these guidelines includes health care professionals involved in the care of perinatal women such as General Practitioners, Obstetricians, Midwives and Child Health Nurses. Other relevant professionals include mental health nurses, psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, social workers, pastoral care staff, lactation consultants, pharmacists, and dieticians.

Perinatal Depressive and Anxiety Disorders

Gender Equity 

2015 Women's Report Card

The 2015 Women’s Report Card builds on the work of previous editions to provide a comprehensive compilation of information about the status and progress of Western Australian women across four areas – leadership, economic independence, women’s safety and

justice, and health and wellbeing. The data in this report indicate that progress on several fronts is slow, however, there have been improvements in several areas including female labour force participation, which increased

to 61% in 2014. In the same period more men accessed flexible work arrangements to care for children than ever before. The data in this report plays an important role in understanding and measuring our progress towards gender equity.

Read the Report Card

Women's Report Card 2012

The Women's Report Cards detail the statistical status of Western Australian women across a range of key indicators in areas such as health, wellbeing, safety, work and education. The Women's Report Cards is intended to provide an evidence base to inform government and private sector policies, services and programs, as well as giving a snapshot of Western Australian women's lives. 

Women's Report Card 2012

 

Women in Leadership: Strategies for Change 2010 – the Department of Local Government and Communities

This report highlights some of the key data and research regarding women’s progress to senior leadership roles in organisations. The report focuses on what has been shown to work in organisations and initiatives that have the potential to bring about the systemic changes that are needed for long term organisational success.

Government in Leadership

 

Women's Health

Empowering the XX Factor – Improving access to women’s health services for disadvantaged women. Final Report. 2014

Perth: Clinical Senate of Western Australia. Department of Health, western australia

The role of the Clinical Senate of Western Australia is to provide a forum where collective knowledge on current strategic health issues are discussed and debated. Recommendations are made and are subsequently provided to the Director General (DG), the State Health Executive Forum (SHEF) and through the DG, to the Minister for Health.

The second meeting of the Clinical Senate of Western Australia for 2014 was held on 4 July. The topic for debate was: Empowering the XX Factor – Improving access to women’s health services for disadvantaged women. The focus for debate was for senators to consider the impact of social disadvantage on women’s health, their health knowledge and access to health services. The mandate for clinicians was to consider the needs of vulnerable women across the life span and reaching women outside the health system in terms of well women’s care. Senators were challenged to consider issues of facilitating access and empowering women to put their health first; encouraging health promotion to reduce burden of disease; facilitating and improving access to cross-sector services; supporting clinicians and health care services to provide the appropriate level of care; and to consider the challenges of providing multidisciplinary holistic care.

She stated that the World Health Organisation asserts that possessing two X chromosomes in itself can be a disadvantage that leads to poorer health outcomes, but in conjunction with social disadvantage, homelessness, being from an aboriginal, culturally and linguistically diverse (CaLD) background, having a disability or residing outside metropolitan Perth may present significant additional challenges for women to access the services so they can stay well.

Empowering the XX Factor

Improving Access to and Service Delivery for Disadvantaged Women Forum Report 2015

Women and newborn health network (Department of Health)

The ‘Improving access to and delivery of health services for disadvantaged women’ forum was facilitated by the Womens and Newborns Health Network on 24 July 2015. The forum was held in response to recommendation four from the July 2014 Clinical Senate of Western Australia (WA) debate ‘Empowering the XX Factor: Improving access to women’s health services for disadvantaged women’. The aims of the forum were to:

  • Deliver on the above Clinical Senate recommendation by facilitating an opportunity for interagency and cross-sector engagement to look at ways to improve service delivery to disadvantaged women.
  • Identify solutions for delivering health services to disadvantaged women across Western Australia.
  • Consider who should be involved in addressing these solutions.

Read the Report

 

Western Australian Women’s Health Strategy 2013 – 2017

The Western Australian Women's Health Strategy is a whole of health strategy. The aim of the Strategy is to improve the health and wellbeing of Western Australian women and particularly those women who are at most risk. It promotes substantive equality and social inclusion by focusing on priority areas and particular high risk groups of women that need targeted action.

The Strategy will be implemented through an annual planning, monitoring, review and reporting cycle. Each plan will be reviewed at the end of the cycle and will be published in an Annual Action Plan Statement by Women and Newborn Health Service, Women's Health Policy and Projects Unit.

There is no funding attached to the implementation of this Strategy.

Setting the Scene 

The Strategy: