Because of her we can

Found in: Latest news

Because of her we can

 

Data released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) reveals that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are increasingly investing in themselves through education, with a 45 per cent increase in non-school qualification attainment between 2008 and 2014–15.

The findings have been released among previously unpublished data, which celebrates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, timed to coincide with NAIDOC Week and its theme, "Because of her, we can!"

In other findings, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women continue to be key contributors in the community, with three in ten (30 per cent) providing unpaid care to people in their family and community (to a person with disability, long-term health condition or old age).

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have an important role in leading and connecting with culture. Between 2002 and 2014–15, the proportion of women reporting a connection to homelands has increased from 70 to 75 per cent.

The full results are featured in the ABS publication, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women Celebrated.

A glorious celebration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, long may it continue

Diverse celebrations during NAIDOC Week highlighted the strengths and wide-ranging achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, in protecting country, culture, communities and families, and in working across multiple domains in resisting and challenging racism and other features of colonisation that affect health and wellbeing. Read more of this Croakey article here.

Beyond NAIDOC 2018: Our responsibility to elevate and celebrate the voices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

In this Indigenous XS article, CEO of Djirra, Antoinette Braybrook, acknowledged and celebrated the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women who are ‘obscured from public consciousness’. She writes: ‘For some of our women, this kind of invisibility may be a choice. For many others, it has never been a choice. Systemic barriers and experiences of discrimination all too often silence our women. Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women continue to confront racism, violence and poverty on a daily basis.’

Aboriginal Family Violence Prevention Legal Services (FVPLSs) provide specialist, culturally safe, holistic support to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander victim/survivors of family violence across Australia. More than 90% of their clients nationally are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their children. Ms Braybrook writes: ‘through our on the ground experience, we see acts of courage that would not lead to a photo on a NAIDOC Week poster or a write-up in a newspaper.  We see Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women commit daily acts of strength and resilience in pursuit of a life that many Australians would take for granted. A life without violence. A life that exists outside of prison walls. A life supporting children to grow up strong in culture and identity.’ Read more here